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Eligibility to Order Vital Records

Birth Certificates

Access to birth records is restricted for 100 years following the date of birth. During the first 100 years the following persons may order: the registrant (person named on the record), the registrant’s husband or wife or domestic partner who is registered by the state, child, parent, step-parent until child is age 18, brother or sister, grandparent, grandchild, legal guardian, legal representative, an authorized representative, or a government agency acting in the conduct of its official duties. For reference, see ORS 432.380 (2)(c)(B)(ii).

When ordering a birth certificate, you must state your relationship to the person named on the record; if you are an attorney, you must state whom you represent. If an attorney does not legally represent the person named on the record, they must include how their client is related to the person named on the record. If you are a legal guardian or have power of attorney, you must enclose a copy of the legal document. If you do not share the surname of the person whose record you are ordering, you may be asked to show a copy of your own birth certificate or marriage record or other document to prove you are an immediate family member and have the right to order the record. If you have legally changed your name but have not amended your birth record, you must send a copy of the court judgment of name change. If you are not eligible to order the record, you must include a permission note with the notarized signature of an eligible person. For reference, see ORS 432.350.

Death Certificates

Access to death records is restricted for 50 years after the date of the event. During the first 50 years the following persons may order: The decedent’s husband or wife or domestic partner who is registered by the state, child, parent, brother or sister, grandparent, grandchild, next of kin, legal guardian immediately before death, an authorized representative, a person in charge of disposition, a government agency acting in the conduct of its official duties, an employee or agent of a funeral home or person acting as a funeral service practitioner who is named in the record of death for up to two years following the date of death, or a person that demonstrates to the satisfaction of the state registrar that the certified copy is necessary for a determination related to or the protection of a personal or property right of the applicant. For reference, see ORS 432.380 (2)(c)(B)(iii).

When ordering a death certificate, you must state your relationship to the person named on the record; if you are an attorney, you must state whom you represent. If an attorney does not legally represent the estate of the person named on the record, they must include how their client is related to the person named on the record. If you do not share the surname of the person whose record you are ordering, you may be asked to show a copy of your own birth certificate or marriage record or other document to prove you are an immediate family member and have the right to order the record.

Marriage, Divorce, Domestic Partnership, & Dissolution of Domestic Partnership Certificates

Access to marriage, divorce, domestic partnership, and dissolution of domestic partnership records is restricted for 50 years after the date of the event. During the first 50 years the following persons may order: The registrant (person named on record), the registrant’s husband or wife or domestic partnership who is registered by the state, child, parent, brother or sister, grandparent, grandchild, legal guardian or legal representative, an authorized representative, or a government agency acting in the conduct of its official duties. For reference, see ORS 432.380 (2)(c)(B)(v).

When ordering a marriage, divorce, domestic partnership or dissolution of domestic partnership certificate, you must state your relationship to the person named on the record; if you are an attorney, you must state whom you represent. If an attorney does not legally represent the a person named on the record, they must include how their client is related to a person named on the record. If you do not share the surname of the person whose record you are ordering, you may be asked to show a copy of your own birth certificate or marriage record or other document to prove you are an immediate family member and have the right to order the record.

Additional Instructions

For orders for any record from:

Legal Representatives: If you represent a family member rather than the person named on the record, provide the name of the person you represent and how they are related to the person named on the record.

Authorized Representatives: If you are not related, provide a notarized permission note from the person named on the record, that person’s current husband or wife, or other immediate family member who is eligible to order the record. In some cases you may have to prove the relationship between the person providing the notarized permission and a person named on the record.

Legal Guardians: Attach a photocopy of the legal paperwork proving that you are the legal guardian. Legal guardianship automatically ends when a minor child turns 18 unless the guardianship is granted by a court for an adult for specific purposes.

Third party vendor or private investigator ordering on behalf of an attorney, financial organization, or government agency: Include a statement from that legal representative or organization with a right to order to prove they have delegated their authority to order the record to you or your agency.

 

Links To Information About Ordering Vital Records