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Eligibility to Order Vital Records
Birth Certificates

For 100 years following a birth, only the registrant, immediate family members, the registrant's Oregon registered domestic partner, and legal representatives (includes legal guardians or persons with power of attorney) may order birth records. Government agencies may order if the records are needed in the course of their work or to prevent fraud.

When ordering a birth certificate, you must state your relationship to the person on the record; if you are an attorney, you must state whom you represent. If an attorney does not legally represent the registrant, they must include how their client is related to the person named on the record. If you are a legal guardian or have power of attorney, you must enclose a copy of the legal document. If you do not share the surname of the person whose record you are ordering, you may be asked to show a copy of your own birth certificate or marriage record or other document to prove you are an immediate family member and have the right to order the record. If you have legally changed your name but have not amended your birth record, you must send a copy of the court judgment of name change. If you are not eligible to order the record, you must include a permission note with the notarized signature of an eligible person. For reference, see ORS 432.350 and 432.380.

Death, Marriage, Divorce, Domestic Partnership, & Dissolution of Domestic Partnership Certificates

Access to death, marriage, divorce and Oregon registered domestic partnership records filed in the State Vital Records office is restricted for 50 years after the date of the event. During the first 50 years the following persons may order: family members and their legal representatives, persons or organizations with a personal or property right, and government agencies.

When ordering a death, marriage, divorce, or domestic partnership record, you must state your relationship to the registrant, or your reason for needing the record. If you are a legal representative of a family member, state the name of the person you represent and how they are related to the person named on the record. If you have a personal or property right, explain why you need the record. If you are a third party vendor ordering on behalf of an attorney, financial organization, or government agency, you must include a statement from that entity to prove they have delegated their authority to order the record to you or your agency. If you are not eligible to order the record, please include a permission note with the notarized signature of an eligible person. For reference, see ORS 432.350 and 432.380.

 

Links To Information About Ordering Vital Records