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Emerging Respiratory Infections



Enterovirus D68

Fact Sheets

CDC Resources


Enteroviruses are common causes of illness, especially among infants and children. Many cases are mild or asymptomatic. In August 2014, hospitals in Missouri and Illinois admitted more children than usual with respiratory illness, some of which was caused by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). EV-D68 is now circulating across the U.S., including in Oregon.

Initial reports suggest that those at increased risk for severe illness include children under the age of 5 and those with chronic lung disease, including asthma.

People can protect themselves and others from respiratory illness:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water. For enteroviruses, alcohol hand sanitizer is not a replacement for washing with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. If you don’t have a tissue, cover your mouth with your sleeve.
  • Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home to avoid exposing others at school or in the workplace. 
For Healthcare Providers
For Local Health Departments

Enterovirus D68 Infections: Information for Local Health Departments (pdf)

Local health departments should call the ACDP on-call epidemiologist regarding inquiries about testing: (971) 673-1111.

Disease Reporting ​

Individual cases of EV-D68 are not reportable in Oregon.

Healthcare providers are required by law to report suspected outbreaks of EV-D68 illness to local health departments immediately.

See our disease reporting page for information on how to report and for telephone numbers of local health departments.


H7N9 Influenza A

Human infections with a new avian influenza A (H7N9) virus were first reported in China in March 2013. Most of these infections are believed to result from exposure to infected poultry or contaminated environments, as H7N9 viruses have also been found in poultry in China. While some human H7N9 cases have been mild, most patients have developed severe respiratory illness, with about one-third resulting in death. 

There is no evidence of sustained person-to-person spread of the virus, and most people who were infected have had known contact with poultry. There have been no cases detected in the United States. 

Influenza viruses constantly change, and it’s possible that this virus could change enough to spread among people. People can protect themselves and others from influenza infection by washing their hands, covering their mouths when they cough or sneeze, and staying home when sick.

For more information about influenza, both novel and seasonal, see the Public Health Division Influenza page.

For Healthcare Providers
For Local Health Departments
Disease Reporting​

Healthcare providers and clinical laboratories are required by law to report suspect cases of novel influenza strains like H7N9 to local health departments immediately, day or night. If you cannot reach your local health department, call 971-673-1111 to reach the state health department doctor on call.

See our disease reporting page for information on how to report and for telephone numbers of local health departments.


Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV)

In 2012, a severe illness that can cause fever, lung infections (pneumonia), kidney damage, and death was first identified in persons living on the Arabian Peninsula. It is caused by a new type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses typically cause mild upper respiratory infection like a cold. A coronavirus, however, was responsible for SARS, an illness that killed 800 people in Hong Kong, Southeastern China, and the Toronto area back in 2003. The new virus is called Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus or "MERS-CoV."

Quick Facts
  • Most persons who have become ill with MERS had either been on the Arabian Peninsula within 14 days of becoming ill, or had been in direct, close contact with a person, ill with the disease, who had been there. 
  • In May 2015, illnesses with MERS were noted in people who had visited healthcare facilities in the Republic of Korea. These were traced to a man, ill with MERS, who had recently traveled from the Arabian Peninsula. The outbreak in Korea has since resolved.
  • Cases with exposure in the Arabian Peninsula have been reported in the U.S. Get the latest MERS information from the CDC.

While cases of MERS-CoV in the U.S. represent a very low risk to the public, experts are still learning about how this virus is spread. CDC advises people to protect themselves from MERS and other respiratory illnesses by washing hands often, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, avoiding touching the eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces.

Frequently Asked Questions
For Healthcare Providers
For County Health Departments
Disease Reporting ​

Healthcare providers and clinical laboratories are required by law to report suspect cases of MERS to local health departments immediately, day or night. If you cannot reach your local health department, call 971-673-1111 to reach the state health department doctor on call.

See our disease reporting page for information on how to report and for telephone numbers of local health departments.



Disease Reporting

For information on disease reporting, refer to the sections above for each disease. 


See Also