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Multiple-State Genomics Data

2001 - 2010

Multiple State Genetics Programs have collected population-based genomic data using state surveillance systems.  Examples of such data include: the prevalence of family history for specific chronic conditions, public awareness and collection of family history, perceptions and use of DTC genetic testing as well as genetic testing for breast and colorectal cancer.  By collecting and analyzing population-based data, programs can monitor trends and use the data for program improvement and evaluation.

 

Family History and disease/disorders

 

Asthma

Breast/Ovarian cancer

Cardiovascular Disease

Chronic Disease

Colorectal Cancer

 

Diabetes

Family History

Prostate Cancer

Other Topics

DTC Genetic Testing

Genetic Discrimination

Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots (DBS)

Colorectal Cancer Genetic Testing

                              

Asthma


Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To estimate the prevalence of Utah adults with family members who have been told they have asthma.

N=2,367

  • 33% of UT adults had a family member who had been diagnosed with asthma

Publication/Source
Wrathall J. Utah Department of Health, BRFSS Coordinator[personal communication] 2010.



Breast/Ovarian Cancer


Michigan

  

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To determine the proportion of MI adults with family member with breast cancer.

N=5,504

  • 25.1% of MI adults had a family history of breast cancer, of those females were more likely to report a family history
  • 12.5% of MI adults had at least one first degree relative with breast cancer
  • 10.9% of MI adults had any first or second degree relative with early onset breast cancer
  • 5.4% with of MI adults had at least one first degree relative with early onset breast cancer

Publication/Source
Duquette, D. Michigan Department of Community Health, [personal communication] 2010.

2008

To determine the proportion of MI women with an at-risk family history of breast and ovarian cancer
To determine the proportion of women with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer receiving genetic counseling and testing

N=1,645

  • 8.8% of MI women with at-risk family history of breast and ovarian cancer
  • Those with an at-risk family history were not significantly different from those not at risk for the following: breast cancer screening, routine provider care or health behaviors
  • 10.8-12.4% of those with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer have received genetic counseling and 4.6-5.2% have received genetic testing

Publication/Source
Duquette, D. Michigan Department of Community Health, [personal communication] 2010.

 Top of Page


Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2009

To assess answers to the following questions:

Do you have a parent, brother, sister, or child who has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer?

Which of your close blood relatives (dead or alive) were diagnosed with breast cancer?

How many of your close blood relatives (dead or alive) were diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50?

Which of your close female blood relatives (your mother, sister, or daughter) were diagnosed with ovarian cancer?

Have you ever had genetic counseling for breast or ovarian cancer? This would include a conversation with a genetics expert about your risk for breast or ovarian cancer.

Have you ever heard of a genetic test that determines if a person is at increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer?

Have you ever had a genetic test to determine if you are at increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer? 

Do you think that you should have a genetic test to determine if you are at increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer?

N=1941

  • 10.4% of OR adults have a first degree relative with breast cancer, 3.2% with ovarian cancer, and 1.7% with both breast and ovarian cancer. 
  • Mothers were most frequently listed as having breast or ovarian cancer.
  • Of those with a positive family history, 50.6% have one or more relative who was diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50.

    3.0% of OR females had genetic counseling for breast or ovarian cancer, 1.3% had the genetic test for breast and ovarian cancer, and 21.9% of OR females think they should have the test.

  • 44.0% of OR adults have heard of a genetic test for breast and ovarian cancer.

 

Publication/Source [PDF 74 KB]

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Washington

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2009

To assess answers to the following questions:

To the best of your knowledge, do you have a parent, brother or sister, or child related by blood, who has been diagnosed with breast cancer* by a health care provider?

To be released

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Cardiovascular Disease


Michigan

 

Sudden Cardiac Death of the Young (SCDY)

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2007

To determine the proportion of MI adults with family member who died of sudden cardiac death of the young

N = 2856

6.3% of MI adults have a family history of SCDY; more common in Blacks (11.2%)

Of those, 26.2% had multiple family members who died of sudden cardiac death of the young and 30% had an immediate family member

Publication/Source [PDF 219.14 KB]

  Top of Page


Ohio

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To assess answers to the following question:

If you learned that you had a family history of heart disease, how likely would you be to make lifestyle changes to try and prevent yourself from getting the disease? Lifestyle changes might include changing your diet, exercising more, stopping smoking, and getting more routine health tests or medical tests.

2008: N=6,000
2009: N=1,465

  • 96.4%of Ohio adults would be likely to make lifestyle changes if they learned they had a family history of heart disease

2009

  • 94.8%of Ohio adults would be likely to make lifestyle changes if they learned they had a family history of heart disease

Publication/Source
Coss P. Center for Public Health Statistics and Informatics, Ohio Department of Health [personal communication] 2010.

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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2007

To examine associations between family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the following:

1) preventive practices and recommendations issued by clinicians
2) patients' perceived risk for developing CVD
3) patients' adoption of preventive and screening behaviors
4) presence of risk factors for CVD among persons without CVD.

N=2,566

  • Those with a family history were more likely to report that their clinician asked about their family history information (OR = 2.6), discussed the risk of developing CVD (OR = 2.0), and made recommendations to prevent CVD (OR = 2.1) compared with adults with no family history of CVD.
  • Those with a family history and receiving clinician recommendations were more likely to report making changes in diet or physical activity to prevent CVD (OR = 2.7) compared with people without a family history or people who had not received these recommendations.
  • Persons with a family history of CVD were more likely to report having high cholesterol and high blood pressure, taking aspirin, and having had their cholesterol checked compared with adults with no family history.

Publication/Source

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Chronic Disease


Ohio

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To assess answers to the following questions:

Do you think that a family history of chronic disease, for example heart disease, stroke, diabetes or cancer increases your risk of developing the disease?

2008 N=6,000

2009 N= 1,465

  • 94.7% of Ohio adults think that a family history of chronic disease increases their risk of developing the disease

2009

  • 96.1% of Ohio adults think that a family history of chronic disease increases their risk of developing the disease

Publication/Source
Coss P. Center for Public Health Statistics and Informatics, Ohio Department of Health [personal communication] 2010.

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Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2005

To estimate the prevalence of Utah adults with one or more chronic disease that runs in their immediate family.

2005 N=2,453
2006 N=2,382
2007 N=2,423
2008 N=2,476

  • 72.8% of UT adults who were not adopted had a family history of one or more chronic disease

2006

  • 69.4% of UT adults who were not adopted had a family history of one or more chronic disease

2007

  • 68.4% of UT adults who were not adopted had a family history of one or more chronic disease

2008

  • 68.8% of UT adults who were not adopted had a family history of one or more chronic disease

Publication/Source
Wrathall J. Utah Department of Health, BRFSS Coordinator[personal communication] 2010.

   

link for text of bar graph



Colorectal Cancer


Michigan

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2005

To estimate the prevalence of Michigan adults with at least one first degree with colorectal cancer; compare perception of risk and willingness to change behaviors in those with family history vs. those without

N=5,826

  • 7% of MI adults were estimated to have an immediate family member with CRC; more common relative to be affected was male
  • Those with a family history perceived their risk was higher for developing CRC,; however, only 37% of those with family history perceived their risk to be higher than average
  • 55.6% of those with family history of CRC reported making lifestyle changes to try to prevent CRC

Publication/Source [PDF 331.54 KB]

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New Mexico

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2004

To assess answers to the following question:

For male and female respondents age 50+:
Have any of your nearest blood relatives, that is parents, brothers or sisters , or your children ever been told by a doctor, nurse or other health professional that he or she had colon or rectal cancer

N=1,688

  • 25.9% of adults age 50+ reported having completed a blood stool test using a home kit in the previous two years
  • 50.7% of adults age 50+ reported ever having had either a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy
  • 9.6% of adults age 50+ reported at least one immediate blood relative with history of colorectal cancer
    • Adults age 50+ reporting family history of colorectal cancer were not more likely to report a blood stool test in the previous two years
    • Adults age 50+ reporting family history of colorectal cancer were more likely to report ever having had a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy

Source/Publication
Honey W. New Mexico Department of Health, Epidemiology & Response Division, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau [personal communication] 2010.

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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To describe the relationship between family history status and the development of colorectal cancer among the population of Oregonians.

N=1,839

  • People with a positive family history had a higher likelihood of reporting that their clinician: discussed colorectal cancer screening (OR, 4.2) and of recommended lifestyle change to prevent CRC (OR 2.6) compared to people without a family history.
  • People with a positive family history were also more likely to receive colorectal screening (OR, 2.2) within the recommended time period compared to people without a family history.

Publication/Source

2010

To assess answers to the following questions:

Thinking of your close blood relatives (dead or alive), that is, your parents, brothers, sisters, or children, how many of them have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer by a health care provider?

Which of your close blood relatives (dead or alive) were diagnosed with colorectal cancer?

How many of your close blood relatives (dead or alive) were diagnosed with colorectal cancer before the age of 60? And, how many were before the age of 50?

To be released

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Washington

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2009

To assess answers to the following questions:

To the best of your knowledge, do you have a parent, brother or sister, or child related by blood, who has been diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer by a health care provider?

To assess answers to the following questions:

To the best of your knowledge, do you have a parent, brother or sister, or child related by blood, who has been diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer by a health care provider?

 Top of Page



Colorectal Cancer Genetic Testing


Michigan

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2010

To assess answers to the following questions:

Have you ever heard of a genetic test that would determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

To your knowledge, did you or any of your parents, brothers, sisters or children have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

How likely would you be to have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

  • To be released
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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2010

To assess answers to the following questions:

Have you ever had genetic counseling for colorectal cancer?

Have you ever heard of genetic testing for colorectal cancer?

Have you ever had genetic testing for colorectal cancer?

How interested are you in having a genetic test that could tell you about your chance of developing a disease?

  • To be released
 Top of Page



Diabetes


Kansas

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To assess responses to the following:
Which of the following family members, if any, have been told by a doctor that they have diabetes? Include only blood relatives. Do not include adoptive or those related only by marriage.

2006: N=770
2007: N=846
2008: N=959

  • 29.8% of people reported having a family member with diabetes
  • Percentage of family history increased with an increase in age
  • Adults age 18-24 years old had lower percentage of family history as compared to adults 25 years and older age groups
  • Among Hispanics (40.9%) ,prevalence of family history was significantly higher compared to non-Hispanics (29.0%)
  • Among African Americans (43.7%), prevalence of family history was significantly higher compared to Whites (28.6%).
  • Among adults with diabetes, 57.7% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes
  • Among adults without diabetes, 27.5% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes

2007

  • 30.7% of the respondents reported having a family member with diabetes
  • Percentage of family history increased with an increase in age
  • Adults age 18-24 years old had lower percentage of family history as compared to adults 35 years and older age groups
  • Among Hispanics (36%), prevalence of family history was significantly higher compared to non-Hispanics (30.4%)
  • Among African Americans (41.6%), prevalence of family history was significantly higher compared to Whites (30%)
  • Among adults with diabetes, 63.5% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes.
  • Among adults without diabetes, 28.1% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes.

2008

  • 29.3% of the respondents reported having a family member with diabetes.
  • Percentage of family history increased with an increase in age. Adults age 18-24 years old had lower percentage of family history as compared to adults 45 years and older age groups.
  • Among Hispanics (31.4%), prevalence of family history was higher compared to non-Hispanics (29.2%), though it was not statistically significant
  • Among African Americans (31.7%), prevalence of family history was higher compared to Whites (28.6%), though it was not statistically significant
  • Among adults with diabetes, 56.3% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes
  • Among adults without diabetes, 27.2% of the individuals had a family member with diabetes

Publication/Source

   

link for text of bar graph

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Minnesota

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2004

To assess family history of diabetes.

N=4,406

  • 50% of adults had a family history of diabetes (any blood relative, such as grandparents, parents or their siblings, or brothers or sisters)
  • 73% of adults with diabetes had a family history of diabetes
  • 72% of adults with pre-diabetes had a family history of diabetes
  • 49% of adults without diabetes had a family history of diabetes

Publication/Source [PDF 88.14 KB]

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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2001

To assess family history of diabetes (among parents and siblings).

N=3,784

  • 27.2% of Oregonians have a parent or sibling with a family history of diabetes

Publication/Source

2002

To assess family history of diabetes (among parents and siblings).

N=7,151

  • 27.4% of Oregonians have a parent or sibling with a family history of diabetes

Publication/Source

2003

To determine whether
Oregon adults at highest risk for diabetes:
1) believed that they were at risk for developing diabetes in the future
2) had talked with a health care professional about diabetes
3) had been tested for the disease.

N=1,831

  • Even among people at highest risk for developing diabetes, at most one third reported being concerned about developing diabetes, one fifth reported having discussed their risk with a health professional in the previous year, and less than half reported having been tested for diabetes by a health provider in the previous year
  • After adjusting for multiple factors, having a family history of diabetes was consistently associated with perceived risk of developing diabetes, discussion about diabetes with a health professional, and diabetes testing

Publication/Source

2004

To assess family history of diabetes (among parents and siblings).

N=2,864

  • 26.8% of Oregonians have a parent or sibling with a family history of diabetes

Publication/Source [PDF 270.79 KB]

2005

To evaluate, among people with diabetes, associations between family history of dia­betes and the following:
1) patients' reports of health care provider prac­tices
2) patients' perceived risk of developing diabetes
3) patients' behaviors associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes.

N=6,688

  • Those with a positive family history (strong or moder­ate familial risk for diabetes) were more likely to report their health care provider collects family history infor­mation about diabetes, discusses the risk of developing diabetes or other chronic conditions, and makes recommendations to change their diet or exercise behaviors to reduce the chance of developing diabetes, Compared with respondents at average risk
  • People with a strong family history of diabetes were 5 times more likely to be very or somewhat worried about developing diabetes than were people at average risk (odds ratio [OR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.0-6.2)
  • People with a strong family history were more likely to report making changes in diet and exercise ,compared with people at average risk

Publication/Source

2006

To evaluate, among people with diabetes, associations between family history of diabetes and
1) patients* reports of health care provider practices, 2) patients* perceived risk of developing diabetes, 3) patients* behaviors associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes, 4) patients' screening behavior for diabetes.

N=1,732

  • Non-diabetics with one or more first-degree relative with diabetes reported higher rates of glucose screening compared to non-diabetics without a family history of diabetes (72% vs. 59%)
  • Non-diabetics with two or more first degree relatives with diabetes were more likely to report making changes in diet or exercise to reduce their risk of developing chronic disease compared to non-diabetics without a family history of diabetes
  • Non-diabetics with two or more first degree relatives with diabetes were almost twice as likely to be obese as those without a first degree relative with diabetes
  • Healthcare providers are more likely to counsel their patients with one or more first-degree relatives with diabetes to make lifestyle changes to decrease their risk of developing chronic disease compared to patients without a family history of diabetes

Publication/Source [PDF 350.46 KB]

   

link for text of bar graph

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Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2007

To estimate the prevalence of Utah adults with family members who have been told they are diabetic.

N=2,409

  • 44.8% of UT adults have at least one immediate family member who has been diagnosed with diabetes

2008

To estimate the prevalence of Utah adults with family members who have been told they are diabetic.

N=2,490

  • 47.5% of UT adults have at least one immediate family member who has been diagnosed with diabetes

Publication/Source
Wrathall J. Utah Department of Health, BRFSS Coordinator[personal communication] 2010.

 

link for text of bar graph

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Family History


Michigan

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2004

To determine public perception of provider practice regarding collection of family history and discussion of risks and recommendations.

  • 85.8% of Michigan adults have been asked by a health care professional about their family history
  • Men, Blacks, and those 75 and over were less likely to have had a family history taken by a health care professional
  • Of those who had a family history taken, 61.2% had discussed their risk based on this history with a health care professional
  • Of those, 67.6% had recommendations from their health care professional based on their family history, the most common to change diet

2005

To determine the public's perception about family history and their own practice regarding family history collection

N= 4000-5000

  • 37% of MI adults actively collected health information for relatives for purpose of developing family health history; more common among women, and increased education
  • 67% thought family history was very important to their personal health; more likely for women and whites

Publication/Source [PDF 135.57 KB]

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Ohio

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To assess answers to the following questions:

Has a doctor or other health care professional ever asked you to fill out a form that includes your family medical history or personally asked you about your family medical history?

  • 85.8% of Ohio adults say a health care professional asked them about their family medical history

2009

  • 87.7% of Ohio adults say a health care professional asked them about their family medical history

2008

Did the doctor or health care professional then discuss with you your risk for certain diseases or health problems based on your family history?

  • 63.7% of Ohio adults say a health care professional discussed with them their risk for certain diseases or health problems based on their family history

2009

  • 63.5% of Ohio adults say a health care professional discussed with them their risk for certain diseases or health problems based on their family history

2008

Did the doctor or health care professional make any recommendations to you based on your family history?

  • 62.3% of Ohio adults say a doctor or health care professional made recommendations to them based on their family history

2009

  • 66.6% of Ohio adults say a doctor or health care professional made recommendations to them based on their family history

2008

How much time would you be willing to spend to complete a family medical history, either on your own or at your health care provider's office? We are not asking you to complete a family medical history now, we just want to know how much time you would be willing to spend to complete one.

  • 95% of Ohio adults say they would be willing to complete a family medical history
  • 74.5% of Ohio adults would be willing to spend from 1-30 minutes completing a family medical history
  • 20.6% of Ohio adults would be willing to spend more than 30 minutes completing a family medical history

2009

  • 94.7% of Ohio adults say they would be willing to complete a family medical history

<

  • 70.6% of Ohio adults would be willing to spend from 1-30 minutes completing a family medical history
  • 24.1% of Ohio adults would be willing to spend more than 30 minutes completing a family medical history

2008

How important do you think knowledge of your family's health history is to your personal health?
2008: N=6,000

2009: N= 1,465

  • 98.2% of Ohio adults think knowledge of their family's health history is important to their personal health

2009

  • 99.0% of Ohio adults think knowledge of their family's health history is important to their personal health

Publication/Source
Coss P. Center for Public Health Statistics and Informatics, Ohio Department of Health [personal communication] 2010.

   

link for text of bar graph

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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2007

To assess answers to the following question:

Has a doctor, nurse, or other health care provider ever asked you about your family history of illnesses or health problems? This would include a health care provider asking you to fill out a form or personally asking you about your family history of certain illnesses or health problems.

  • 87.1% of OR adults reported that their healthcare provider asked them about their family health history.

2009

To assess answers to the following question:

Has a doctor, nurse, or other health care provider ever asked you about your family history of illnesses or health problems? This would include a health care provider asking you to fill out a form or personally asking you about your family history of certain illnesses or health problems.

To be released

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Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2005

To estimate the perception of risk among people with a family history of chronic disease

N=2,374

  • 85.7% of UT adults reported that having a family history of chronic disease increased their own risk for chronic disease

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have had a doctor talk with them about health risks based on family history.

N= 2,465

  • 34.1% of Utah adults have had a doctor discuss their health risks based on family history

To estimate the amount of time people would be willing to spend to complete a family medical history.

N=2,468

  • 10.2% of UT adults would not be willing to spend any time to complete a family health history. 22.9% would be willing to spend 1-15 minutes to complete a family medical history. 18.6% would be willing to spend 16-30 minutes. 6.6% would be willing to spend 31-60 minutes, 13.1% would spend 1-2 hours, and 3.3% would be willing to spend more than 2 hours to complete a family medical history. 17.6% of people would be willing to spend however long it took to complete a family medical history. 7.9% were not sure how much time they would be willing to spend.

2006

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have had a doctor talk with them about health risks based on family history.

N=2,398

  • 36.1% of UT adults have had a doctor discuss their health risks based on family history

2005

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have had a doctor make recommendations based on their family history.

2005 N=2,464
2006 N=2,402

  • 26.6% of UT adults have had a doctor make recommendations based on their family history

2006

  • 30.2% of UT adults have had a doctor make recommendations based on their family history

2006

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have read or heard about the importance of knowing their own family health history in the past year.

2006 N=2,386
2007 N=2,415<
2008 N=2,495

  • 58.3% of UT adults had read or heard about the importance of knowing their family health history in the previous year

2007

  • 67.8% of UT adults had read or heard about the importance of knowing their family health history in the previous year

2008

  • 66.9% of UT adults had read or heard about the importance of knowing their family health history in the previous year

2006

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have ever actively collected health information from their relatives for the purposes of developing a family health history.

2006 N=2,407
2007 N=2,430
2008 N=2,522

  • 25.4% of UT adults had actively collected information for their personal family health history

2007

  • 27.7% of UT adults had actively collected information for their personal family health history

2008

  • 29.8% of UT adults had actively collected information for their personal family health history

2006

To estimate the percentage of Utah adults who have ever shared the information they collected on their family health history with a doctor, nurse, or other health professional.

2006 N=646
2007 N=723
2008 N=763

  • 81% of UT adults had shared the information they actively collected for their family health history with a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional

2007

  • 86.6% of UT adults had shared the information they actively collected for their family health history with a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional

2008

  • 87.2% of UT adults had shared the information they actively collected for their family health history with a doctor, nurse, or other health care professional

Publication/Source
Wrathall J. Utah Department of Health, BRFSS Coordinator[personal communication] 2010.

   

link for text of bar graph

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Washington

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2009

To assess answers to the following questions:

Has a doctor or other health care professional ever asked you to fill out a form or personally asked you about your medical family history?

Did the doctor or health care professional then discuss with you your risk for certain diseases or health problems based on your family history?

To be released

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Prostate Cancer

New Mexico

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2004

To assess responses to the following question:

For male respondents age 40+:
Has your father, brother or son ever been told by a doctor, nurse, or health professional that he had prostate cancer?

N=1,688

  • 58.4% of males age 40+ reported history of ever having had a PSA test
  • 49.1% of males age 40+ reported history of a PSA test within the past 2 years
  • 45.0% of males age 40+ reported ever having discussed PSA test with physician
  • 3.6% of males age 40+ reported ever having been told by a physician that they had prostate cancer
  • 10.2% of males age 40+ reported a father, brother, or son with history of prostate cancer
    • Males age 40+ reporting family history of prostate cancer were more likely to report history of testing than those reporting no family history
    • Males age 40+ reporting family history of prostate cancer were more likely to have ever been told by a physician that they had prostate cancer than those reporting no family history

Source/Publication
Bruggeman L, Honey W, Baum S. New Mexico Department of Health, Epidemiology & Response Division, Injury and Behavioral Epidemiology Bureau [personal communication] 2010.

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Other Genomics Topics


DTC Genetic Testing


Connecticut

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To evaluate Connecticut residents' knowledge and awareness about genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer

N=5,746

  • Women tended to indicate a greater knowledge of genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) than men.
  • Women were twice as likely to describe their knowledge as 'a lot' (19.6%) compared to men (9.9%) and 1.3 times as likely to describe their knowledge as 'some' (34.4%) compared to men (25.6%).
  • Women were also more likely than men to have seen or heard about an ad for genetic testing for HBOC (52.8% vs. 45.0%).

Publication/Source [PDF 35.98 KB]

2009

To determine awareness and uptake of DTC access to genetic tests

 

N=6,019

  • 22.9% of CT adults were aware of DTC genetic tests that examine a person’s genetic make-up for health risks, from such companies as 23andMe, deCODEme, and Navigenics
  • Of CT adults aware of such tests, the most common source of this information was from TV or radio.
  • 0.7% of CT adults reported having such a genetic test
  • Of those who had a genetic test, 60% indicated they had discussed the results with their health care provider

Publication/Source

Foland J. Connecticut Department of Public Health, Genomics Epidemiologist [personal communication] 2011.

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Michigan  

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To determine awareness and uptake of DTC access to genetic tests.

N=5,250

  • 7.6% of MI adults were aware of DTC access for genetic tests; more likely to be aware if female and for those with greater education and household income
  • Of those, 11.5% knew of someone who obtained such tests

Publication/source

2009

To determine awareness and uptake of DTC access to genetic tests

N=5,883

  • 15.8% of MI adults were aware of DTC genetic tests that examine a person's entire genetic make-up for health risks from such companies as 23andMe, deCODEme, and Navigenics
  • Of MI adults aware of such tests, the most common source of this information was from TV or radio
  • 0.5% of MI adults reported having such a genetic test
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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

Assess awareness and use of direct-to-consumer genetic tests and compare to other states

N=1,867

  • Comparing populations in Michigan, Oregon, and Utah, people in Oregon had the highest awareness of the tests (24.4%) and people in Michigan had the lowest awareness (7.6%).
  • Predictors of awareness were: more education, higher income, and increasing age, except among those 65 years or older. Less than 1% had used a health-related direct-to consumer genetic test.

Publication/Source

2007

To track awareness and use of direct-to-consumer genetic tests on a population level.

N=2,910

  • 26.5% of Oregonians have heard of DTC genetic tests, but only 0.6% have ever used them

Publication/Source [PDF 41.55KB]

2008

To track awareness and use of direct-to-consumer genetic tests on a population level.

N=1,832

  • 32.6% of Oregonians had heard of DTC genetic tests
  • The newspaper was the most common source that people reported hearing about DTC genetic tests
  • Among Oregonians age was positively correlated with whether they have heard about DTC genetic tests and whether they have used these tests
  • Only 1% of Oregonians reported using DTC genetic tests

Publication/Source [PDF 58.37 KB]

2009

To assess answers to the following questions:

Several companies (such as 23andMe, deCODEme, Navigenics) are advertising genetic tests that scan a person's entire genetic makeup for health risks. You can order these tests directly, without the involvement of a healthcare provider. Have you heard or read about these tests?

Where did you hear about these tests?

Have you ever used any of these tests?

Did you discuss the results with your healthcare provider?

N=1931

  • 29.1% of OR adults were aware of DTC genetic tests that examine a person’s entire genetic make-up for health risks from such companies as 23andMe, deCODEme, and Navigenics
  • Of OR adults aware of such tests, the most common source of this information was from TV or radio.
  • 0.8% of OR adults reported having such a genetic test.
  • Almost half of OR adults discussed the results with their health care provider.

 

Publication/Source [PDF 74 KB]

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Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To estimate the prevalence of Utah adults who have ever heard of genetic tests.

2006 N= 2,426
2007 N= 2,455
2008 N= 2,537
2009 N= 2,431

  • 20.2% of UT adults had ever heard of genetic tests

2007

  • 25.4% of UT adults had ever heard of genetic tests

2008

  • 29.8% of UT adults had ever heard of genetic tests

2009

  • 28.6% of UT adults had ever heard of genetic tests

2009

To find out where UT adults have heard about genetic tests.

N=788

  • Adults reported hearing about genetic tests from the following sources: newspaper 14.4%, magazine 16%, TV or radio 45%, health professional 3.4%, internet 7.2%, family member 4% (this estimate should be interpreted with caution), friend 2.1%, or some other source 12.8%

2009

To estimate the prevalence of UT adults who have ever had a genetic test.

N=785

  • 2.1% of UT adults had ever had a genetic test.

2009

To estimate the prevalence of UT adults who have ever discussed the results of a genetic test with a doctor or health care provider.

N= 19

  • 80.2% of UT adults who had a genetic test had discussed the results of the test with their health care provider

Publication/Source
Wrathall J. Utah Department of Health, BRFSS Coordinator [personal communication] 2010.

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Michigan, Oregon, Utah

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2006

To conduct a systematic search to identify genetic tests that are sold DTC without involving a health care provider.

Michigan: N= 5,499
Oregon: N= 1,867
Utah: N= 2,441

  • For the 3 states, estimates of awareness of direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic tests ranged from 7.6% in Michigan to 24.4% in Oregon
  • Age, household income, and education level were consistently associated with awareness of direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic tests for all of the surveys
  • Those who were more affluent and better educated were more likely to be aware of direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic tests
  • Other sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity) were not consistently associated with awareness of direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic tests

Publication/Source

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Washington

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2009

To assess answers to the following question:

Some companies are offering genetic tests of your DNA that are advertised to improve your health and prevent disease. You can order these tests directly, without the involvement of a healthcare provider. Have you ever used any of these tests?

To be released

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Genetic Discrimination


Connecticut, Michigan, Ohio, Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2010

To obtain base line information on awareness of genetic discrimination laws.

To assess answers to the following questions:

Have you ever heard of a genetic test that would determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

To your knowledge, did you or any of your parents, brothers, sisters or children have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

How likely would you be to have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

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Newborn Screening Dried Blood Spots (DBS)


Michigan

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2008

To gauge public perception about the use of DBS for health research.

N= 3,082

  • 72% favored use of DBS for health research
  • 84.9% favored use of DBS for health research on childhood diseases
  • 86.8% favored use of DBS for health research on chronic diseases
  • 84.2% favored use of DBS for health research on effects of harmful substances
  • Increasing education associated with strong favor

Publication/Source [PDF 102.25 KB]
Manuscript submitted

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Colorectal Cancer Genetic Testing


Michigan

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2010

To assess answers to the following questions:

Have you ever heard of a genetic test that would determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

To your knowledge, did you or any of your parents, brothers, sisters or children have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

How likely would you be to have a genetic test to determine if the colorectal cancer in your family was inherited?

To be released

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Oregon

 

Year

Objective

State reported findings

2010

To assess answers to the following questions:

Have you ever had genetic counseling for colorectal cancer?

Have you ever heard of genetic testing for colorectal cancer?

Have you ever had genetic testing for colorectal cancer?

How interested are you in having a genetic test that could tell you about your chance of developing a disease?

To be released

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