Topics
A to Z
Data &
 Statistics
Forms &
Publications
News &
Advisories
Licensing &
Certification
Rules &
Regulations
Public Health
Directory
Print this Article   Bookmark and Share
2003 Oregon select reportable disease cases and incidence-Lyme disease

2003 Reportable Communicable Disease Summary


Report Index

Lyme disease

Lyme Disease is a tickborne, spirochetal, zoonotic disease characterized by a distinctive skin lesion, systemic symptoms and neurologic, rheumatologic and cardiac involvement occurring in varying combinations over a period of months to years. The first manifestation in about 60% of patients appears as a red macule or papule that expands slowly in an annular manner, sometimes with multiple similar lesions. This distinctive skin lesion is called erythema migrans (EM). Incubation period for EM ranges from 3 to 32 days after tick exposure; however, the early stages of the illness may be asymptomatic, and the patient may present with later manifestations.
Diagnosis is currently based on clinical findings supported by serologic data, ELISA and Western blot confirmation. In the USA, endemic foci exist along the Atlantic coast concentrated from Massachusetts to Maryland, in the upper Midwest in an expanding focus currently concentrated in Wisconsin and Minnesota, and in the West in California, Oregon and Washington. Currently, increasing recognition of the disease is redefining endemic areas; cases have been reported from 47 states, and from Ontario and British Columbia, Canada. Elsewhere, related borrelioses have been found in Europe, the former Soviet Union, China and Japan.


In 1997?1998, a tick identification and Borrelia isolation study was conducted by the CDC and the Oregon Department of Human Services. Findings included Ixodes pacificus and its reservoir, the deer mouse. Isolation of the organism was successful as 3.5% of collected ticks tested positive for the spirochete.


Lyme Disease by Year
Lyme Disease by Onset Month
Lyme Disease by Age and Sex
Lyme Disease: Oregon vs. U.S.
Lyme Disease by County
AIDS
Campylobacteriosis 
Chlamydiosis 
Cryptosporidiosis 
Escherichia coli O157 infection  
Giardiasis 
Gonorrhea 
Haemophilus influenzae infection  
Hepatitis A 
Hepatitis B (acute) 
Hepatitis B (chronic) 
Current Page: Lyme Disease. Lyme Disease 
Malaria 
Measles 
Meningococcal disease 
Pertussis 
Salmonellosis 
Shigellosis
Early Syphilis 
Tuberculosis 
Tularemia 
Yersiniosis

Download Options for Printing.Print Options:

Lyme: Summary by Year, by Age and Sex, by County
(pdf)
(68K)


2003 Reportable Communicable Disease Summary
Complete
Report

(pdf)
(776K)

Back to Top