Topics
A to Z
Data &
 Statistics
Forms &
Publications
News &
Advisories
Licensing &
Certification
Rules &
Regulations
Public Health
Directory
Print this Article   Bookmark and Share
Program Evaluation

The HIV Care and Treatment Program conducts special studies in order to assess the needs of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) and to evaluate whether the services currently being delivered successfully meet those needs. Results from these studies help guide HIV service planners as they design, implement, and improve the Ryan White-funded system of care.

On this page:

  • Executive Summary: Investigating How to Change Systems of HIV Care in Oregon to Support Smoking Cessation
  • Descriptive Epidemiology of Newly Reported Hispanic HIV/AIDS Cases in Oregon, 2010
  • 2009 CAREAssist Client Survey
  • 2014 OHOP Satisfaction Report
  • OHOP Evaluation
  • Oregon Balance of State HIV/AIDS & Services Systems Integration Plan
  • Access & Care Delivery Barriers for Latino PLWH/A, 2009
  • Oregon Medical Practices that Provide HIV Care, 2008 Snapshot
  • Eating Right when Money's Tight
  • 2007 HIV Case Management Satisfaction Report
  • Out of Care Summary
  • 2007 CAREAssist Client Satisfaction Survey
  • Title II HIV Case Management Evaluation
  • Oregon Housing Opportunities in Partnership: Summary of Project Evaluation Design and Findings
  • Out of Care Study: Phase Two
  • 2005 Needs Assessment for PLWH/A in Care
    • Executive Summary: Investigating How to Change Systems of HIV Care in Oregon to Support Smoking Cessation

      Many people living with HIV (PLWH) use tobacco, which is associated with preventable adverse health outcomes.  However, little is known about how to tailor cessation interventions for PLWH.

      2013 Executive Summary: Investigating How to Change Systems of HIV Care in Oregon to Support Smoking Cessation

       

      Descriptive Epidemiology of Newly Reported Hispanic HIV/AIDS Cases in Oregon, 2010

      The objectives of this surveillance project were to describe demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, HIV testing and care patterns, and the social context of HIV among Hispanics living with HIV in Oregon.
       
      2010 Descriptive Epidemiology of Newly Reported Hispanic HIV/AIDS Cases in Oregon

       

       

      2009 CAREAssist Client Survey: A Report on Clients' Health and Well-Being and their Experiences with the Program

      The CAREAssist Program surveyed all clients in September 2009, and received responses from 1210 clients (58%). Eight in 10 clients reported living with one or more chronic health conditions, in addition to HIV. Over half of clients (54%) reported “depression, anxiety or emotional problems” and more than 1 in 3 (38%) reported chronic pain. In addition, several different measures on the survey indicated that CAREAssist clients are experiencing poorer physical and mental health and well-being than the general population, and the smoking prevalence among CAREAssist clients (42%) remains more than double that among Oregon residents overall (19%).
       
      Most clients see their HIV doctor frequently and 82% said they were able to adhere to their HIV treatment always or most of the time. CAREAssist clients who had someone to provide practical support (defined as help with daily tasks including grocery shopping, housecleaning, cooking, or transportation) were almost twice as likely to say they were treatment adherent all or most of the time.
       
      A majority of clients (96%) rated the quality of the CAREAssist Program as excellent or good.

      2009 CAREAssist Client Survey

      2008 OHOP Satisfaction Report

      Summary of OHOP program satisfaction evaluation design and findings.

      2014 OHOP Satisfaction Report

      OHOP Evaluation

      Summary of OHOP program evaluation design and findings.

      OHOP Evaluation

      Oregon Balance of State HIV/AIDS Housing & Services Systems Integration Plan

      An extensive summary of the housing needs of and resources available to Oregonians living with HIV. The plan focuses on strategies for integration with "mainstream" housing and supportive services, and includes regional affordable housing resource guide.

      Oregon Balance of State HIV/AIDS Housing & Services Systems Integration Plan

       

       

      Access & Care Delivery Barriers for Latino PLWH/A, 2009

      The purpose of this study was to provide the HIV/STD/TB Program with a current description of the nature and extent of barriers to providing and accessing HIV care for Latino PLWH/A living in Part B (i.e., non-Portland metropolitan) counties.

      Latino Part B Oregon Barriers to Care

      Oregon Medical Practices that Provide HIV Care, 2008 Snapshot

      This report provides a current description and enumeration of medical practices in Oregon that provide HIV care. The report answers the following three evaluation questions:


      * How many medical practices in Oregon provide HIV care and treatment, and where are they located?
      * What do HIV medical care facilities in Oregon look like in terms of practice affiliation, size, and type?
      * What types of services do HIV medical care facilities provide?

      Oregon Medical Practices that Provide HIV Care, 2008 Snapshot

      Eating Right when Money's Tight

      Healthy eating is important for everyone, but is especially critical for people living with HIV/AIDS. This evaluation project used survey data, case management utilization data, and narrative data from focus groups and interviews to describe: the food-related needs of PLWH/A participating in Ryan White Part B case management, resources clients access for help with food and groceries and how many people access those resources, and the barriers clients face in meeting food-related needs.

      Food and Nutrition Report

      2007 HIV Case Management Satisfaction Report

      Surveys were sent to 713 clients from 20 Ryan White sites across 26 Oregon counties to assess client satisfaction with the quality of case management services. In general, clients reported a high level of satisfaction, with nearly 6 in 10 respondents (59%) describing the quality of case management services as “excellent,” while another 25% rated service quality as “good.” Clients with fewer contacts with their case managers and clients that characterized the number of past-year case management contacts as “too few” were significantly less satisfied with the overall quality of case management services and with each of the seven satisfaction items (e.g. location, promptness, professional knowledge) than clients with more contact. Women were less satisfied with the overall quality of service than were men, but no gender differences emerged when examining the individual satisfaction items, which makes this finding difference difficult to interpret, and important to monitor. There were no reported differences in satisfaction with overall quality or perceived helpfulness of case management services by age, race/ethnicity, region, years since HIV diagnosis, or length of time in case management.

      2007 HIV Case Management Satisfaction Report

      Out of Care Summary

      The Out of Care Project examined if people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) were receiving CD4 and viral load testing at least annually. Data were collected from interviews with HIV healthcare providers, HIV service providers, former CAREAssist clients, and current CAREAssist or Ryan White Part B Case Management clients. HIV care service providers and former CAREAssist clients offered insight into numerous structural and systemic factors that might be associated with PLWH/A not receiving CD4 and viral load tests annually. Results from this project suggest that nearly all current and former CAREAssist and Part B Case Management clients were getting their CD4 or viral load tests at least annually; however, many of these clients said they need assistance and support around medication, financial and insurance issues.

      Out of Care Summary

      2007 CAREAssist Client Satisfaction Survey

      The CAREAssist Program surveyed all clients in November 2006 to assess client satisfaction, quality of medical care, smoking prevalence, and needs around smoking cessation. A majority of clients (93%) rated the quality of the CAREAssist Program as excellent or good. Suggested program changes included decreasing paperwork, adjusting the income eligibility requirements, and making small adjustments to several aspects of customer service. More than 90% of CAREAssist clients rated their medical care as good or excellent. A much higher percentage of CAREAssist clients reported smoking compared to Oregon's population overall (42% of CAREAssist clients vs. 19% of Oregonians). However, almost half stated that they were seriously considering quitting in the next month and 83% said they would use products to help them stop smoking if they were available at no cost. The program is implementing policy changes based on feedback from the survey.
       

      2007 CAREAssist Client Satisfaction Survey

      Title II HIV Case Management Evaluation

      The purpose of this project was to evaluate the Title II HIV Case Management system from the perspective of consumers and case managers. In 2005, a self-administered survey was mailed to all Title II clients via their case manager. In 2006, PDES conducted telephone interviews with Title II case managers. This report summarizes the findings of the two studies and should be considered along with other data sources, such as case management service utilization data, in order to provide a holistic picture of the Title II case management system in Oregon.

      Overall, client satisfaction with Title II HIV case management services remains high, but decreased between 2004 and 2005. Some clients reported higher satisfaction than others. Clients reporting seven or more contacts per year with their case manager were consistently more satisfied with case management services than those with fewer contacts. Clients living in geographic regions characterized by low population density, greater distances between services and fewer dedicated HIV/AIDS service providers were less satisfied with case management services.

      Case managers believe that case management is very important to clients who need it. Many case managers think case management helps clients stay healthy and connected to medical care. Most case managers indicated that the State HIV Care Service Program is very supportive to the case managers, yet the reality of decreased funding and increasing caseloads still makes it difficult to case manage clients. In addition, many case managers feel the acuity scale and the re-assessment paperwork need to be changed, in order for them to continue providing quality care within the current, low-resource environment.

      Case Management Evaluation Final Report

      Oregon Housing Opportunities in Partnership: Summary of Project Evaluation Design and Findings

      The Oregon Housing Opportunities in Partnership (OHOP) program is funded by 3 grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA).  The OHOP program is administered by the Oregon Department of Human Services, HIV Client Services (DHS/HCS).  The primary goals of OHOP are (a) to assist people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH/A) in obtaining stable, sustainable housing so that they may avoid homelessness and (b) improve their access to, and engagement in, HIV care and treatment.  Program Design and Evaluation Services (PDES) was contracted by DHS/HCS to evaluate the OHOP program.  Four components were included in the scope of work.

      1. Conduct post-intake client satisfaction surveys with clients enrolled in OHOP for six months or longer.  Questions asking for clients’ perceptions about the quality of OHOP services and suggestions for program improvements were included in the surveys, as were items pertaining to clients’ HIV care and treatment.
      2. Conduct key informant interviews with Housing Coordinators, Ryan White Care Act (RWCA) Case Managers, clients, and landlords.  Interviews assessed the relative strengths and limitations of the OHOP program, and the degree to which clients benefit from participation in the program.
      3. Provide technical assistance to DHS/HCS during the implementation of the CARE Ware 4.0 database, including identification of information necessary for reporting and evaluation activities to be included in client utilization records.
      4. Utilize the 2002 and 2005 Needs Assessment surveys conducted with PLWH/A in Oregon to compare housing-related information across time.

      2006 OHOP Final Report

      Out of Care Study: Phase Two

      This special study was designed to better understand the estimate of unmet need in Oregon; specifically, to better understand why PLWH/A may not be receiving CD4 and viral load testing, which are important features of quality medical care for PLWH/A. Phase Two examined the trajectory of medical care for PLWH/A who left or were dropped from the CareAssist Program following policy and cost-saving changes. The study involved follow-up with these clients in order to assess their current medical care, health insurance and service needs, and to document the effect of losing CareAssist on their health and well-being.

      Out of Care Study - Phase Two

      2005 Needs Assessment for PLWH/A in Care

      The 2005 Needs Assessment surveyed PLWH/A involved in the statewide case management system (Titles I and II). The survey addressed four key areas of interest:

      • What are the most important service needs, gaps, and barriers to care for PLWH/A?
      • What do health care access and unmet need for regular medical care look like?
      • How adequate is housing and housing stability?
      • How do these issues vary by geography, race/ethnicity, gender, age, and diagnosis-related characteristics?

      Survey results include information about medical care usage, health insurance, housing and homelessness, and needs for program services like dental care, transportation, and help accessing prescription drugs. Data are included regarding gaps in service and barriers to accessing services.


      2005 HIV/AIDS Care Needs Assessment