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Rules & Implementation Guidance
Drinking Water Services is proposing to amend three Oregon Administrative Rules (OARs) related to public water systems. Learn more about the changes, including how to submit comments.



Oregon Drinking Water Regulations
  • Drinking Water Rules
    Oregon's Drinking Water Quality Act and Administrative Rules for Public Water Systems serve to ensure safe drinking water for Oregonians.

Rule Implementation Guidance
  • Groundwater Rule
    The Groundwater Rule (GWR) applies to all public water systems that use groundwater sources or purchase groundwater. The primary purpose of the rule is to protect public health from bacterial and viral pathogens in public groundwater systems.
  • Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule
    The Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR) applies to all community and non-transient non-community water systems that add a primary or residual disinfectant other than ultraviolet light (UV), or deliver water that has been treated with a primary or residual disinfectant other than UV. Systems that purchase disinfected water are included in this rule. The Stage 2 DBPR builds on the existing Stage 1 rule and provides increased health protection.
  • Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2)
    The Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2) rule applies to all public water systems that use surface water or groundwater under the direct influence of surface water (GWUDI). The purpose of the rule is to ensure adequate treatment of surface water sources with higher levels of Cryptosporidium and to address uncovered finished water reservoirs.
  • Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act
    The Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act amends the Safe Drinking Water Act regarding the use and introduction into commerce of lead pipes, plumbing fittings or fixtures, solder and flux. The law is effective January 4, 2014. EPA has provided the following document to assist manufacturers, retailers, plumbers and consumers in understanding the changes to the law: