Topics
A to Z
Data &
 Statistics
Forms &
Publications
News &
Advisories
Licensing &
Certification
Rules &
Regulations
Public Health
Directory
Print this Article   Bookmark and Share
Event History

This is archived information from the 2011 Japan Radiation Event (March 11, 2011 to May 15, 2011). This information is no longer being updated as this is not considered a local hazard at this time.


 

 

Oregon Public Health reports minimal health risk from trace radiation from Japan

See Event Resources for current fact sheets, Questions and Answers, translations in other languages, and other information from the federal government and various partners.

Past Event History
Week of April 25- April 29, 2011
Week of April 18 - April 22, 2011
Week of April 11 - April 15, 2011
Week of April 4 - April 8, 2011
Week of March 28 - April 1, 2011
Week of March 21 - March 25, 2011
Week of March 14 - March 18, 2011
Week of March 11 - March 13, 2011

Updated Thursday, May 5, 2011, 12:20 PM: 

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is no public health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. The levels of radiation have been steadily decreasing.

In fact, as of Monday, April 25, radiation levels from the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis from the Japan nuclear power plants were shown to be at less than detectable levels, even with sophisticated monitoring instruments.

Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency continue to confirm that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of rainwater, tap water, sea water and milk tested to date continue to show no radiation from events in Japan. This news is expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation from Japan that had been detected in our air monitoring for several weeks after the March 11 tsunami and earthquake events in Japan. 

Trace amounts of radiation from Japan had been detected in the air in Oregon after the March 11 events in Japan. When it rained or snowed, precipitation also picked up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation posed minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan have been well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as from minerals and sunlight. Information about rainwater and drinking water is now available in English as well as six other languages: Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean and Chinese.

Oregon’s results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state was so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) previously detected in Oregon from the events in Japan had been less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division officials continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels – and now less than detectable levels of radiation coming from Japan - we post new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

See Event History for complete timeline

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Updates for week of April 25 - April 29, 2011  

 

Updated Thursday, April 28, 4:47 PM: 

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is no public health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. The levels of radiation have been steadily decreasing.

In fact, as of Monday, April 25, radiation levels from the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis from the Japan nuclear power plants were shown top be at minimally detectable levels. This means that the levels are the smallest amount of radioactive material that you can positively identify as being there.

Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency continue to confirm that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of milk and tap water tested to date continue to show no radiation from events in Japan. This news is expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation from Japan that has been coming detected in our air monitoring.

Trace amounts of radiation from Japan had been detected in the air in Oregon after the March 11 events in Japan. When it rained or snowed, precipitation also picked up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation posed minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan were well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as from minerals and sunlight. Information about rainwater and drinking water is now available in English as well as six other languages: Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean and Chinese.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state was so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) previously detected in Oregon from the events in Japan had been less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels – and now minimally detectable levels of radiation coming from Japan and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing -- we post new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

See Event History for complete timeline.

Updated Monday, April 25, 2:38 PM: 

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is no public health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. The levels of radiation have been steadily decreasing.

In fact, as of Monday, April 25, radiation levels from the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis from the Japan nuclear power plants were shown top be at minimally detectable levels. This means that the levels are the smallest amount of radioactive material that you can positively identify as being there.

Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency continue to confirm that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of milk and tap water tested to date continue to show no radiation from events in Japan. This news is expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation from Japan that has been coming detected in our air monitoring.

Trace amounts of radiation from Japan had been detected in the air in Oregon after the March 11 events in Japan. When it rained or snowed, precipitation also picked up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation posed minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan were well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as from minerals and sunlight. Information about rainwater and drinking water is now available in English as well as six other languages: Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean and Chinese.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state was so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) previously detected in Oregon from the events in Japan had been less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels – and now minimally detectable levels of radiation coming from Japan and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing -- we post new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

See Event History for complete timeline.

   

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Updates for week of April 18 - April 22, 2011   

 

Updated Monday, April 18, 2:03 PM:
The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is no public health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of milk and tap water tested to date show no radiation from events in Japan. This news has been expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation coming from Japan detected in our air monitoring.

As reported previously, trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as from minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis remain within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

Information about rainwater and drinking water is now available in English as well as six other languages: Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean and Chinese.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels of radiation coming from Japan, and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing we post new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

See Event History for complete timeline.

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Updates for week of April 11 - April 15, 2011  

 

Updated Thursday, April 14, 3:41 PM:

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is no health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of milk and tap water tested to date show no radiation from events in Japan. This news has been expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation coming from Japan detected in our air monitoring.

As reported previously, trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis remain within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels of radiation coming from Japan, and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing we will begin posting new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

See Event History for complete timeline.

 

Updated Monday, April 11, 11:22 AM:

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. New numbers have been posted. Due to the trace levels of radiation coming from Japan, and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing we will be posting new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays. 


See Event History for complete timeline.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Updates for week of April 4 - April 8, 2011

Updated Friday, April 8, 1:23 PM:

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. There is minimal health risk due to the trace levels of radiation from Japan. Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. Samples both of milk and tap water tested to date show no radiation from events in Japan. This news has been expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation coming from Japan detected in our air monitoring.

As reported previously, trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis remain within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted that the health risk here is minimal, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is less than .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. Due to the trace levels of radiation coming from Japan, and the fact that they have been stable or decreasing we will begin posting new levels twice weekly, on Mondays and Thursdays.

 

This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information.

See Event History for complete timeline.

 

 

Updated Thursday, April 7, 1:32 PM:

Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. No radiation levels were detected in an Oregon sample of milk taken March 29. This news has been expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation coming from Japan detected in our air monitoring.

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians. The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

In Washington, trace amounts of radiation have been found in milk, according to EPA test results. The low levels found there do not pose a health risk. Oregon is awaiting similar test results from the EPA and will report them when they are sent to us. Based on the Washington results, Oregon Public Health officials do not expect any health risk from drinking milk.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information.


See Event History for complete timeline.

 

Updated Wednesday, April 6, 3:45 PM:

Tests performed by the Environmental Protection Agency confirmed today that milk sold in Oregon is safe to drink. No radiation levels were detected in an Oregon sample of milk taken March 29. This news has been expected due to the extremely low levels of radiation coming from Japan detected in our air monitoring.

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

In Washington, trace amounts of radiation have been found in milk, according to EPA test results. The low levels found there do not pose a health risk. Oregon is awaiting similar test results from the EPA and will report them when they are sent to us. Based on the Washington results, Oregon Public Health officials do not expect any health risk from drinking milk.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information.

 

Updated Tuesday, April 5, 10:10 AM:

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

 

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

In Washington, trace amounts of radiation have been found in milk, according to EPA test results. The low levels found there do not pose a health risk. Oregon is awaiting similar test results from the EPA and will report them when they are sent to us. Based on the Washington results, Oregon Public Health officials do not expect any health risk from drinking milk.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information. 


See Event History for complete timeline.

 

Updated Monday, April 4, 11:00 AM:

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

 

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

In Washington, trace amounts of radiation have been found in milk, according to EPA test results. The low levels found there do not pose a health risk. Oregon is awaiting similar test results from the EPA and will report them when they are sent to us. Based on the Washington results, Oregon Public Health officials do not expect any health risk from drinking milk.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information. 

See Event History for complete timeline.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________

 

Updates for week of March 28 - April 1, 2011  

 

Updated Friday, April 1, 10:30 AM:

The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

 

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

In Washington, trace amounts of radiation have been found in milk, according to EPA test results. The low levels found there do not pose a health risk. Oregon is awaiting similar test results from the EPA and will report them when they are sent to us. Based on the Washington results, Oregon Public Health officials do not expect any health risk from drinking milk.

Oregon Public Health Division will continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information. 

Updated Thursday, March 31, 11:05 AM:
The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation samples pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

EPA's recommendation to state and local governments is to continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information.

Updated Wednesday, March 30, 4:34 PM:
The Oregon Public Health Division and the Environmental Protection Agency continue to track levels of radiation linked to the nuclear power plant event in Japan. Trace amounts of radiation from Japan have been detected in the air in Oregon. When it rains or snows, precipitation also picks up small amounts of this material. However, these trace amounts of radiation in air and precipitation samples pose minimal risk to the health of Oregonians.

The small amounts of radiation that have come to Oregon due to the events in Japan remain well below the typical levels seen every day from natural sources, such as minerals and sunlight. Radiation levels detected by the EPA monitoring stations in Portland and Corvallis are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Iodine 131 and cesium 137 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000-mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016 millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from one chest X-ray.

EPA's recommendation to state and local governments is to continue to coordinate closely with EPA, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. EPA will continue to communicate our nationwide sampling results as they come in.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information. 

Updated Tuesday, March 29, 11:59 AM:
Radiation levels in Portland from the Japanese nuclear plants are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels. Oregon Public Health officials are continuing to conduct extensive analysis of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitor data in Portland. 

 

The more detailed analysis confirms that there continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon as a result of events in Japan. Cesium 137 and iodine 131 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors. 

 

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000 mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary. The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016  millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from ONE chest x-ray.


Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. This website is updated daily with fact sheets and other information.

Updated Monday, March 28, 10:45 AM:
Radiation levels in Portland from the Japanese nuclear plants are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels.

Oregon Public Health officials are continuing to conduct extensive analysis of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitor data in Portland. 

The more detailed analysis confirms that there continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon as a result of events in Japan. Cesium 137 and iodine 131 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000 mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016  millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from ONE chest x-ray.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public.

________________________________________________________________________________

Updates for the week of March 21 - March 25, 2011

Updated Friday, March 25, 4:55 PM:
Radiation levels in Portland from the Japanese nuclear plants are staying within the normal range. Specific elements such as iodine 131 and cesium 137 are still at trace levels.

Oregon Public Health officials are continuing to conduct extensive analysis of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitor data in Portland. 

The more detailed analysis confirms that there continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon as a result of events in Japan. Cesium 137 and iodine 131 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000 mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016  millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from ONE chest x-ray.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public.

Updated Thursday, March 24, 4:30 PM:
As expected, Oregon Public Health officials continuing extensive analysis of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitor data in Portland have detected minuscule levels of iodine 131 and cesium 137 forms of radiation connected with Japan’s nuclear emergency. The more detailed analysis confirms that there continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon as a result of events in Japan. Cesium 137 and iodine 131 are radioactive elements that are found in nuclear reactors.

Trace amounts of iodine 131 were found on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday; trace amounts of cesium were found on Tuesday only. 

These results are consistent with findings reported by Washington and California, as well as by federal and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000 mile distance from Japan, combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The estimated biological effect from the trace amounts of radiation (iodine 131 and cesium 137) currently detected in Oregon from the events in Japan is about .00016  millirems. To put this into perspective, a person would need to be exposed to this level all day, everyday for more than 100 years, to equal the exposure from ONE chest x-ray.

Oregon Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. 

Updated Wednesday, March 23, 3:59 PM:

Radiation monitoring within expected levels - no health risk to Oregonians
Oregon radiation monitors continue to confirm that no radiation levels of concern have reached the U.S. Oregon Public Health officials studying an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air monitor in Portland have detected minuscule levels of iodine 131, which is radiation connected with Japan’s nuclear emergency. Low levels of iodine 131 have been expected on the West Coast as a result of events in Japan. This more detailed analysis confirms there continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon. The tiny amounts of radioactive iodine are far lower than levels that would be a health concern.

“Our finding is consistent with findings in Washington and California. We have expected to find trace amounts of the isotopes released from the Japanese plant. There is no health risk,” says Gail Shibley, administrator of the Office of Environmental Public Health, Oregon Public Health Division.

These results are consistent with findings reported by federal, California, Washington and Canadian partners. Because of the nearly 5,000 mile distance from Japan combined with air diffusion, radiation reaching our state is so diluted there is no health risk here, making protective action unnecessary.

The EPA reports that in a typical day, Americans receive doses of radiation from natural sources like rocks, bricks and the sun that are about 100,000 times higher than what has been detected coming from Japan. For example, the levels coming from Japan are 100,000 times lower than what you get from taking a roundtrip international flight.

Public Health officials continue to track general radiation levels in Oregon and the information is available to the public. 

Updated Tuesday, March 22, 2011, 2:03 PM:
Radiation from the damaged nuclear reactors in Japan is not a health risk in Oregon. People can now see daily radiation levels from the EPA monitoring sites in Oregon.  

“We do not expect any reading above normal. This will be a way for people to see the levels on a day-to-day basis,” says Gail Shibley, administrator of the Office of Environmental Public Health, Oregon Public Health Division.  It is important to note that there is naturally occurring radiation in our environment at all times, which will be reflected in the monitoring station data.

Updated Monday, March 21, 2011, 5:28 PM:
Latest information from Oregon and Northern California air monitoring stations.

Updated Monday, March 21, 2011, 3:53 PM:
Translated documents available: Facts sheets and Questions and Answers are now available in multiple languages. See Event Resources for translated documents.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Updates for the week of March 14 - March 18, 2011

Updated Friday, March 18, 2011, 4:15 PM:
Radiation from the damaged nuclear reactors in Japan is not a health risk in Oregon. The EPA has an extensive network of radiation monitors around the country and no radiation levels have been detected. There are two monitoring stations in Oregon. There has been recent news of miniscule amounts of radiation reported by the EPA on the West Coast as expected. The levels would have to be at least hundreds of thousands of times higher than these readings before state health officials would recommend protective actions. Oregon Public Health experts are working with federal, state and local radiation experts for the most updated information. We don't expect to see significant increases in radiation as a result of the Japanese disaster. Again, there is no health risk to Oregonians nor do we expect any. The EPA website has up-to-date monitoring information. Also the EPA is providing more detailed monitoring information from each of EPA's stations.

Updated Friday, March 18, 2011, 12:41 PM:
Oregon Public Health experts are continuing to monitor the current situation in Japan. There continues to be no health risk to people in Oregon from the radiation release in Japan. As of 12 PM (EST) EPA's RadNet radiation air monitors across the U.S. show typical fluctuations in background radiation levels. Due to the mandatory state furlough day, Friday, March 18, 2011, personnel will be unavailable to answer questions until Monday, March 21, 2011. If you call the information line about radiation, there will be a recorded message available, however there will be no one to answer further questions until Monday, due to the furlough.

Updated Thursday, March 17, 2011, 5:15 PM:
State Public Health personnel are continuing to monitor the current situation in Japan. Due to the mandatory state furlough day, Friday, March 18, 2011, personnel will be unavailable to answer questions until Monday, March 21, 2011. If you call the information line about radiation there will be a recorded message available, however there will be no one to answer further questions until Monday, due to the furlough.

Updated Wednesday, March 16, 2011, 5:58 PM:
Updates to facts sheets and Q and A's occurred. See most recent versions for latest information.

Updated Tuesday, March 15, 2011, 5:53 PM:
Information line: 1-877-290-6767
Information E-mail: RPS.OHA@state.or.us
Updates to fact sheets and Q and A's occurred. See most recent versions for latest information.

Updated Monday, March 14, 2011, 12:06 PM:
STATEMENT FROM OREGON PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION DIRECTOR MEL KOHN, M.D., M.P.H. The Oregon Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program and the Radiation Protection Services are closely monitoring information on the radiation release reported in Japan. According to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission the incident does not pose a radiation health threat to Oregonians. Given the thousands of miles between the two countries, Hawaii, Alaska, the U.S. Territories and the U.S. West Coast are not expected to experience any harmful levels of radioactivity. Public health officials monitor information from the Environmental Protection Agency's network of highly sensitive radiation detectors, which provide hourly reports of ambient radiation. The monitors are part of a national network run by the Environmental Protection Agency called "RadNet." There are two monitors in Oregon, one in Corvallis and one in Portland. There have been no elevated radiation readings detected in Oregon and air samples remain normal. Given the current size of the release and the distance from Oregon, we do not expect that to change and there is no public health risk to the state. We are also in contact with our federal partners including the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Oregon state health department will continue its monitoring work as the situation in Japan develops and changes.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Updates for the week of March 11 - March 13, 2011

 

Updated Sunday, March 13, 2011, 12:46 PM:
STATEMENT FROM OREGON PUBLIC HEALTH DIRECTOR MEL KOHN, M.D., MPH.:
The Oregon Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program and the Radiation Protection Services are closely monitoring information on the radiation release reported in Japan after an explosion at a reactor site Saturday. There have been no elevated radiation readings detected in Oregon and air samples remain normal. Given the current size of the release and the distance from Oregon, we do not expect that to change and there is no public health risk to the state. We are also in contact with our federal partners including the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Oregon State Health Division will continue its monitoring work as the situation in Japan develops and changes.

 

Updated Friday, March 11, 2011, 3:17 PM:
Tsunami message updated from the National Weather Service 2:57 PST: Tsunami levels along the California and Oregon coast have dropped below one meter in all locations except Crescent City, CA. Warning is being downgraded to an advisory. Oregon Public Health Emergency Preparedness will return to normal operations at 3:30 p.m. There have been no requests for state health or medical assistance at this time and no apparent significant tsunami-related impacts to Oregon. Oregon PHEP will continue to monitor events and is prepared to reactivate should the need arise.

Updated Friday, March 11, 2011, 2:30 PM:
Several sites in Oregon and California continue to record tsunamis in excess of one meter. The situation remains dangerous - please stay tuned to instructions from your local emergency officials before returning to endangered areas.

Updated Friday, March 11, 2011, 12:56 PM:
Tsunami message from the National Weather Service: The warning and advisory regions remain unchanged.

Updated Friday, March 11, 2011, 10:30 AM:
Tsunami waves are expected to continue until shortly after noon PST.

Updated Friday, March 11, 2011, 9:55 AM:
Tsunami warning remains in effect for the Oregon Coast as of 9:01 PST. See the NOAA website for more details.