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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I become a Lead Based Paint Renovation (LBPR) Licensed Contractor

Responsibilities

Exceptions

Accredited Training

Training Cost and Certificate Expiration

CCB's Lead Based Paint Renovation License

Contact CCB

Q: As a contractor, how do I become a Lead Based Paint Renovation (LBPR) LIcensed Contractor?

CCB licensed contractors that perform renovation, repair and painting work on a pre-1978 home or child-occupied facilities where children under age 6 attend must:

  1. Get trained in lead-safe work practices. To do this, you must complete an initial 8-hour Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) training from an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or Oregon Health Authority (OHA) (or other EPA-authorized state or tribe) accredited training provider. Upon completion of the course, you will receive a course completion certificate. Note: Individuals who already completed an eligible training course before October 4, 2011, may choose to take the EPA/OHA four-hour refresher course instead of the initial training course to become RRP certified.
  2. Apply to licensing agency. If you are self-employed, apply to CCB to receive a "Certified Lead-based Paint Renovation (LBPR) Contractor License". If you are employed by a CCB-licensed business, have your employer apply to CCB for a "Certified Lead Based Paint Renovation Contractors License". Your employer need only apply one time for all employees. CCB will need to see your course completion certificate (and those of other contractors who took the training course). Please visit Oregon CCB web site for more information and to receive an application.
  3. Follow requirements for RRP notices, work practices and record-keeping.

Q: What are my responsibilities as a LBPR licensed contractor?

  • Provide a copy of your EPA/OHA training certificate and license to your client.
  • Keep a copy of your EPA/OHA training certificate and license at worksite at all times. 
  • Tell your client what lead-safe methods you will use to perform the job.
  • Ask your clients to share results of any previously conducted lead tests.
  • Provide clients and tenants with a copy of EPA's lead hazard information updated pamphlet Lead-Safe Certified Guide to Renovate Right and document compliance with this requirement using the OHA Receipt of Renovation Notice Form (pdf). This pamphlet was updated due to amendments to the RRP regulation effective October 4, 2011. Renovators must now begin providing the revised version. You may use the older version if you have printed stock remaining. Please be sure to include replacement page 10 which can be found on EPA's website.
  • Keep records to show that you and your workers are trained and that you follow lead-safe work practices on the job. Use OHA's Renovation Record-Keeping Checklist (pdf) to make record-keeping easier.
  • Ensure compliance with RRP Rule.

Q: I am working on a pre-1978 structure that is NOT a home or child-occupied facility where children under 6 attend. Do I need RRP training and a Certified Lead-Based Paint Renovation license?

No. The RRP rule applies to contractors who perform RRP work on pre-1978 home or child-occupied facilities where children under 6 attend.

Q: I am a contractor renovating housing receiving federal assistance. Are there differences between EPA's RRP regulations and HUD Lead Safe Housing Rule?

Yes. The RRP rule and the HUD Lead-Safe Housing Rule are different. Please review the differences between HUD's Lead-Safe Housing Rule and EPA RRP regulations.

Q: What is accredited RRP Training?

EPA/OHA accredited providers are training providers that are approved by EPA (or other EPA-authorized state or tribe) or OHA to provide training for renovators under the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program. Accredited RRP training is an 8-hour, lecture and hands-on course that contractors must take and successfully complete to be eligible to apply for CCB's Lead-Based Paint Renovation (LBPR) contractors license. Upon completing the course, you receive a course completion certificate. The RRP course completion certificate is valid for 5 years.

Please visit Oregon Accredited RRP Training Providers for a list of providers and courses. Some training providers on the list train statewide and nationwide. 

Q: How much does an accredited training course cost and when does the course certificate expire?

Accredited training providers charge $200 - $300 per course. OHA does not set training prices, please call training providers directly for more information.

Course certificates expire in 5 years. Contractors must take a four-hour RRP fresher course before certification expires.

Q: What is a certified Lead-Based Paint Renovation (LBPR) license?

CCB issues LBPR licenses to CCB licensed contractors who successfully complete RRP training. CCB charges a $50/year licensing fee that must be renewed annually. The license makes contractors eligible to perform renovation, repair and painting work on structures built before 1978 under Oregon Administrative Rules OAR 812-007-0000 to 812-007-0025 and 812-007-0300 to 812-007-0374. Please refer to steps to becoming certified.  

Q: How do I contact the CCB?

Phone: 503-378-4621 

Website: Oregon CCB