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Adult Special Project FAQs

What is the goal of the project?
Who is eligible for the project funds in Oregon?
Can counties partner with each other on project activities?
If one or more counties partner with each other, which one would receive the money?
When can LHDs start work on the project?
Can LHDs use the money to buy vaccine?
Can LHDs use 317 vaccine for this special project?
Are there any restrictions on LHDs to seeking other funds (e.g., other grants) to supplement their work and purchase Tdap and influenza vaccine?
Without vaccine, how do we entice healthcare institutions, businesses, and LTCs to partner with us?
What interventions should LHDs use to increase adult immunizations?
What is considered a healthcare institution?
What is considered a long-term care (LTC) facility?
Where can I find a listing of the hospitals and skilled nursing facilities that OHPR studies?
Our county has one hospital which owns clinics. Can we count the hospital and its clinics as separate healthcare institutions?
Our Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) has two sites. Can we count them as two separate entities?
Will OIP work with pharmacies at the corporate level to lay ground work for this project?
Will the funds for this project come to LHDs through IGA #135572, Program Element 43?
Our county competes with pharmacies for vaccine revenue. Why should we participate in this project?
Can we use project funds to hire a mass vaccinator to administer vaccine?
Can we use project funds to develop an immunization coalition for our county?
How will the project be evaluated?
What are the reporting requirements for LHDs?
Is there a particular format for reporting expenditures?
What will happen if we don’t reach the 10% improvement goal noted in the project’s objectives?
How can Immunization Coordinators communicate with each other about the project?

What is the goal of the project?

With the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more people are expected to have health insurance that will cover the cost of immunizations. All this won’t happen immediately; the gaps should start to be reduced over the next couple of years. As a result, the goal of this project is to build the adult immunization infrastructure to increase access to adult vaccines.
The project’s charter provides additional information about objectives, deliverables, milestones, etc. It is available on the project’s webpage or by contacting the project coordinator.


Who is eligible for the project funds in Oregon?

The ACA funds were awarded only to local health departments (LHDs).


Can counties partner with each other on project activities?

Yes. They would need to complete a multi-county agreement form and identify a lead LHD for the project.


If one or more counties partner with each other, which one would receive the money?

The lead LHD would receive the funds and then coordinate activities and expenses with the other LHDs.

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When can LHDs start work on the project?

Work may begin as soon as an LHD receives acknowledgement from the Oregon Immunization Program (OIP) that their signed agreement was approved.


Can LHDs use the money to buy vaccine?

No. The overarching goal is to build a sustainable adult immunization infrastructure. Helping your partners set up their own vaccination processes will go a lot further to building that infrastructure than just providing vaccine on a one-time or short-term basis.


Can LHDs use 317 vaccine for this special project?

No. Oregon is facing a significant reduction in funds for 317 vaccine and anticipated allocations to each LHD have already been made for the rest of this year. These vaccines should be used for activities already planned for 317-eligible individuals. A possibility exists that Oregon will receive additional 317 funds in the fall of 2012. Vaccine purchased with these funds could be used for the project.


Are there any restrictions on LHDs to seeking other funds (e.g., other grants) to supplement their work and purchase Tdap and influenza vaccine?

Not at all, and if an LHD wishes to purchases vaccine with other funds, OIP will help that county order vaccine at CDC prices.


Without vaccine, how do we entice healthcare institutions, businesses, and LTCs to partner with us?

OIP recommends that you first approach your potential partner, tell them about the project, and learn about their current capabilities, needs and barriers regarding vaccinations. This type of discussion should help you and your partner generate ideas about suitable project activities.

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What interventions should LHDs use to increase adult immunizations?

Below is a list of four categories of evidence-based interventions that were provided to OIP by the CDC. OIP has added an additional category (not evidence-based) that deals with the ALERT IIS.

  1. Enhancing Access to Immunizations
    • Home visits to increase vaccination
    • Reducing client out of pocket costs
    • Expanding types of providers and locations to receive adult vaccinations

  2. Strategies to Increase Community Demand
    • Client/patient reminders
    • Community based interventions implemented in combination (client reminders/ recalls, tracking of clients and manual outreach, educational messaging, mass and small media, expanded access to vaccines)

  3. Healthcare Provider or System Based Strategies
    • Provider reminder systems (electronic or paper-based)
    • Provider assessment and feedback on vaccination coverage among clients
    • Standing orders
    • Healthcare interventions implemented in combinations

  4. Increasing Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel
    • Offering reduced cost or free vaccination
    • On-site vaccination
    • Vaccinations offered at multiple times (e.g. day and night shifts on multiple days)
    • Vaccination offered conveniently (e.g. mobile vaccination carts)
    • Requirements and declination forms

  5. Train partners on the ALERT IIS
    • Identify partners who are not currently using ALERT and educate them on its purpose
    • Help set up ALERT IIS training for partners
    • Teach partners how to use specific features of ALERT (e.g., train pharmacists on the forecasting function)

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What is considered a healthcare institution?

For the purposes of the grant, healthcare institutions are defined as: hospitals (LHDs must address these first for the grant); offices of physicians, dentists and other health care practitioners; home health care services; outpatient care centers; medical and diagnostic laboratories; other ambulatory health care services; and nursing care facilities.


What is considered a long-term care (LTC) facility?

For the purposes of the grant, LTCs are defined as chronic acute care facilities, skilled nursing facilities (SNF), nursing homes, assisted living and residential care facilities, and group homes. Part of the project’s evaluation, however, involves examining baseline and change in influenza vaccination rates at these facilities. OIP recommends that LHDs first consider working with SNFs because the Office of Health Policy and Research (OHPR) reports on SNF flu vaccination rates. Otherwise, LHDs will have to collect data from the other types of LTCs so that vaccination rates may be calculated.


Where can I find a listing of the hospitals and skilled nursing facilities that OHPR studies?

Please see Appendix B of the report, Healthcare Acquired Infection Reporting Program, Healthcare Worker Influenza Vaccination Rates: 2010-2011 Season. This report can be found on the Adult Immunization Special Project webpage under Reports or at the OHPR website.


Our county has one hospital which owns clinics. Can we count the hospital and its clinics as separate healthcare institutions?

Yes.

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Our Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) has two sites. Can we count them as two separate entities?

Yes.


Will OIP work with pharmacies at the corporate level to lay ground work for this project?

Yes. The project coordinator and OIP manager will contact corporations once LHDs identify partner pharmacies for the project.


Will the funds for this project come to LHDs through IGA #135572, Program Element 43?

Yes.


Our county competes with pharmacies for vaccine revenue. Why should we participate in this project?

The mission of public health in Oregon is to promote health and prevent the leading causes of death, disease and injury. When LHDs work with pharmacies to improve access to adult immunizations, they support that mission. The LHD has a role in assuring access across the lifespan for all recommended vaccines. Most counties are not able to do this without partnering with others.


Can we use project funds to hire a mass vaccinator to administer vaccine?

Yes, as long as the mass vaccinator either uses vaccine you’ve acquired through another fund or the mass vaccinator uses their own vaccine not paid by this grant.


Can we use project funds to develop an immunization coalition for our county?

Yes, as long as you involve representatives of partner entities listed in the project’s objectives (i.e., pharmacies, large employers, community health centers, healthcare institutions, long-term care facilities).


How will the project be evaluated?

Please refer to the project’s evaluation plan on the project’s webpage. This plan outlines the evaluation methodology along with the responsibilities of LHDs and OIP in the evaluation.


What are the reporting requirements for LHDs?

LHDs will report on their project activities and expenditures monthly to the project coordinator. OIP will provide a reporting form for that purpose.

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Is there a particular format for reporting expenditures?

LHDs will only be asked for a total dollar amount for each month.


What will happen if we don’t reach the 10% improvement goal noted in the project’s objectives?

The project’s evaluation is as much about process as it is about increasing vaccination rates. With all partners putting in a good faith effort, we will learn a great deal about the successes and challenges around building an adult immunization infrastructure.


How can Immunization Coordinators communicate with each other about the project?

A listserv has been created for the project, and it can be found at http://listsmart.osl.state.or.us/mailman/listinfo/oip_adult_imm_project. This tool can be used to share information and ideas and to ask questions. All points of contact identified on the LHD agreements have been enrolled on that listserv. If you want to enroll additional people from your LHD, please have them sign up at the listserv.


If you need more information, please contact Kathy Scott, the project coordinator, at Kathryn@kdscott.com or 971-244-2266.


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